Canada Set to Increase IP-related Governmental Fees by 25%

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (“CIPO”) published a proposal this week to increase most governmental fees, within a couple of years, by something like 25%. Yeah, lo and behold, setting such fees in stone for decades on end doesn’t make for the most financially sound government service, what do you know?

Though we’ve grown accustomed to such fees remaining fixed in Canada (or even being slightly lowered as was the case for 2022), for years and years, CIPO is now realizing not increasing these fees over the years has turned its operations into a deficit-running operation, something that just isn’t sustainable. As a result, CIPO now has to consider a substantial increase of the fees it imposes in matters relating to I.P. protection, in Canada.

The page at issue contains a list of proposed fee increases, that include, for example in matters relating to trademarks, to give you an idea:

  • Application for the registration of a trademark: from $347.35 to $434.19;
  • For each additional class: from $105.26 to $131.58;
  • Recording of a transfer: from $100.00 to $125.00; and
  • Extension of time : from $125.00 to 150.99$.

Given this proposed increase (which in all likelihood will indeed materialize), we of course recommend to all businesses to seek to protect their I.P. assets without waiting any further.

Major Update of the Canadian Government Login Process for Businesses

The Canadian government finally seems to have realized allowing individual agencies to create and manage credentials individually, for each business that may want to interact with governmental online services, simply does not make sense, including from a cybersecurity standpoint. Starting soon, users who want to login will have to go through a whole new system.

CIPO (the Canadian Intellectual Property Office) recently started offering information and training on the upcoming changes, so as to allow businesses to make the transition, including those that may need to interact with I.P.-related services, for example as to patents, trademarks or industrial designs.

The new system being deployed by the Canadian government will do away with ISED, the former system whereby businesses could create user IDs to login and interact with governmental online services.

The new identification process will involve each business creating an ID (called the GCKey) to which authorized individual users will have to be linked. The system will also require individuals to go through identification and authentication, to make sure they are the actual individual they purport to be and that they are indeed authorized by the organization at issue. Though you may think this was already the case, it was not.

One offshoot of this new method of allowing access by users on behalf of their organization is that it will do away with the sharing of credentials. Once implemented, it will no longer be possible for all users of an organization to “share” a single user ID (account), as was so frequently until now, for purposes of accessing governmental online services.

The new system will also force all user to use 2-step verification to login into their online account, also something most large organizations have been requiring for a while now. The actual implementation of the changes start March 28.