CIPO Ends Regional Courier Services Counters

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (“CIPO“) recently elected to abandon its practice of allowing third parties, such as applicants and agents, to send correspondence and documents through regional counters, considered until now as “Designated Establishments”.

This change will be effective August 16, 2021.

Until now, those who needed to exchange with CIPO otherwise than by fax or electronically, could avoid having to resort to mailing stuff, by visiting a counter in certain major Canadian cities (e.g. Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver, etc.), in order to hand-in their documents. This will no longer be possible, once this change comes into effect.

This may happen, for example, to documents and evidence to be submitted in opposition or Section 45 proceedings which may not be sent by fax, due to the limitations of this antiquated technology. From now, if it gets to that, CIPO will expect use of registered mail or the like to send-in your documents.

On the bright side, CIPO is providing us with more and more links and forms which may now be used to communicate electronically and, hopefully, having to resort to obsolete means such as the fax and the mail.

Canadian Trademarks Office Updates Rules on Refusing Extensions of Delays

According to a new practice notice published by CIPO this week, the Trademarks Office (the “TMO“) will no longer grant extensions, as a matter of course, when an applicant needs more than 6 months to respond to an examination report.

As you may remember, until now, the TMO allowed applicants to request one (1) extension of delay, without having to show cause or provide any sort of real explanation. This allowed applicants to get 12 months to respond to the report of an examiner who objected to the registration of the mark at issue. From now, however, the TMO will require applicants to show the existence of “exceptional circumstances” if they want to obtain such an extension. No more of those quasi-automatic extensions, if you will.

No doubt tired of being stuck with average registration delays that we can’t seem to get under control, CIPO basically decided to opt for the homework approach: if the teacher gives you until Friday, you have until Friday -or the dog better really have eaten your homework.

The notice repeats some previously published typical examples of what may be considered “exceptional circumstances”, adding that the concept will apply not only to responding to office actions from an examiner, but also to cases where the TMO is asking a registrant to classify the goods/services associated with his/her/its trademark according to the Nice classification.

Interestingly, the notice also explains (as a similar notice did last year) that, due to a technicality, applicants should note that no governmental fees will generally be payable to request an extension to respond to an examiner report, as the delays at issue are not technically provided by the statute or its regulation. Good to know.

Harley-Davidson Manages to Stop Sales of a (Trademark) Infringing Bike Built With Some of its Genuine Parts

The Canadian Federal Court recently handed us an interesting decision, in H-D U.S.A. c. Varzari (2021 FC 620), in which it enjoined an individual (and his business) from continuing to offer a sort of Harley inspired motorcycle, built using a custom frame and genuine Harley-Davidson parts.

Though the above sounds a little outrageous, the story is of course a little more complicated than that and, NO, we’re not dealing with the owners of the Harley-Davidson trademarks nuking the harmless personal project of a biking enthusiast. Instead, the case deals with an individual who visibly really likes H-D bikes and who decided not only to build his own version of that type of motorcycle, but also started selling it, under a name referring expressly to Harley-Davidson, in addition to using a logo clearly copied from one of HARLEY’s, in addition to using the iconic orange color for the frame, and opting to HARLEY-DAVIDSON parts and, maybe, claiming he did so a little too enthusiastically in his promotional materials.

The bike at issue was initially offered as the “Harley Davidson Willie G Edition”, a name which the defendant changed upon being contacted by HARLEY to “The ‘H’ Edition”. To give  you an idea of what we’re dealing with, here is a picture of the bike at issue, including the copycat shield logo and the orange color reminiscent of Harley’s iconic color:

So as to set the stage as to where this is headed, I should mention HARLEY owns Canadian trademark registrations as to several logos, including the following, in connection with motorcycles and various types of parts and accessories:

Not surprisingly, the court finds several instances of infringement here, and enjoins the defendant from continuing with his sale of the motorcycle model at issue. Given that the court concludes that orange for bikes qualifies as a common law trademark, coupled with the issue of the logo itself, infringement seems easy to justify in such a case but isn’t all that interesting.

However, what IS worth mentioning is the treatment by the Federal Court in this case of the issue of the inclusion (in the “The ‘H’ Edition” bike) of genuine HARLEY-DAVIDSON parts, in addition to a custom frame that the enthusiast designed and presumably had built to imitate a Harley-type bike. According to the judgement at issue, inclusion of such genuine parts, along with repeatedly claiming the parts of this bike came from HARLEY, contributed to the giving the average person an overall impression that the whole motorcycle may have been produced by or for HARLEY, or at the very least under its authority.

For the court, the fact that the defendant conspicuously included genuine HARLEY parts that were of course visible in the end-product, contributed to giving an overall impression to the average buyer that the whole machine was a HARLEY-DAVIDSON, even though that specific name and mark did not appear on the cycle itself.

If you look at the picture above, it seems the bike may have been offered without any markings showing any original brand or name, perhaps leaving potential buyers to draw a conclusion as to the origin of the bike by seeing a H-D-like shield on the frame along with the orange color, as well as various HARLEY marks imprinted on (genuine) components like handlebars, foot pegs, etc. Indeed, looking at the resulting product, the Federal Court judge had little difficulty agreeing that an average consumer would more than likely conclude that this bike came from HARLEY-DAVIDSON, including because of the display and use of several of HARLEY’s mark on the machine and its components. Though the court rejected the suggestion that the shape of the frame itself was a problem, having found a likelihood of confusion with several registered and unregistered marks of HARLEY, it made sense to award an injunction as well as damages against the infringer.

Though the court stopped well short of saying that including genuine HARLEY parts was a problem in the general sense, it did state that, in this particular case, the presence of those genuine (branded) components WAS part of the reason for the probable confusion. Looking at the overall resulting bike, one would be naturally lead to the conclusion that this bike had something to do with HARLEY, above and beyond just supplying parts, hence the infringements.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, however, after reading the decision, I don’t think anyone should read into it any major change of Canadian trademark law in general, or that relating to trademark rights exhaustion in particular. As has always been the case, anyone may continue to resell branded goods without the need to normally worry about looking over your shoulder, so to speak. At law, generally, it remains that reusing of reselling branded products, even to make something new is NOT a problem. It is the case in the U.S. and in Canada, and that rule isn’t going anywhere.

What’s new here, I think, is a willingness by a court to read into the (re)use of numerous genuine (branded) parts, as components for a new thing, an attempt at creating an overall impression that the whole thing (i.e. the bike) was produce by or under the authority of the original trademark owner. Is this likely if a single branded component has been used? Likely not. Is this likely if the resulting product is itself adequately (clearly) branded with a non-infringing mark? Probably not. Is this likely if a resulting product is showing a patchwork of third-party marks on components? Definitely not. etc.

So, though the result of this case seems interesting, I don’t think we should read too much into it. The theory of trademark rights exhaustion is alive and well in Canada. Rest assured.